Top 5 Wednesday #3





Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme created by Lainey over at GingerReadsLainey on Youtube. This meme has you pick up your top 5 for a certain theme.

This week's top 5 is:

Books with Hard Topics



I won't go into much detail on these books, mostly because I believe you should read them without knowing all that much about them (besides the main summary I guess). If you yourself have or know someone who suffers from any of the topics on these books, please read them, you will understand a bit more and maybe you will decide to get help either for yourself or someone you care about. You are not alone and you can and will beat it.

I read all these books and gave them between a 3 and a 5 star rating.




Schizo
by Nic Sheff



Miles is the ultimate unreliable narrator—a teen recovering from a schizophrenic breakdown who believes he is getting better . . . when in reality he is growing worse.

Driven to the point of obsession to find his missing younger brother, Teddy, and wrapped up in a romance that may or may not be the real thing, Miles is forever chasing shadows. As Miles feels his world closing around him, he struggles to keep it open, but what you think you know about his world is actually a blur of gray, and the sharp focus of reality proves startling.






Forgive me, Leonard Peacock
by Matthew Quick



Today is Leonard Peacock's birthday. It is also the day he hides a gun in his backpack. Because today is the day he will kill his former best friend, and then himself, with his grandfather's P-38 pistol.

But first he must say good-bye to the four people who matter most to him: his Humphrey Bogart--obsessed next-door neighbor, Walt; his classmate Baback, a violin virtuoso; Lauren, the Christian homeschooler he has a crush on; and Herr Silverman, who teaches the high school's class on the Holocaust. Speaking to each in turn, Leonard slowly reveals his secrets as the hours tick by and the moment of truth approaches.





By the time you read this I'll be dead
by Julie Anne Peters



Daelyn Rice is broken beyond repair, and after a string of botched suicide attempts, she’s determined to get her death right. She starts visiting a website for “completers”— www.through-the-light .com.

While she’s on the site, Daelyn blogs about her life, uncovering a history of bullying that goes back to kindergarten. When she’s not on the Web, Daelyn’s at her private school, where she’s known as the freak who doesn’t talk.

Then, a boy named Santana begins to sit with her after school while she’s waiting to for her parents to pick her up. Even though she’s made it clear that she wants to be left alone, Santana won’t give up. And it’s too late for Daelyn to be letting people into her life…isn’t it?





Thirteen Reasons Why
by Jay Asher



Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a strange package with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker - his classmate and crush - who committed suicide two weeks earlier. Hannah's voice tells him that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them.

If he listens, he'll find out why. Clay spends the night crisscrossing his town with Hannah as his guide. He becomes a firsthand witness to Hannah's pain, and learns the truth about himself-a truth he never wanted to face.





Suicide Notes
by Michael Thomas Ford



Fifteen-year-old Jeff wakes up on New Year's Day to find himself in the hospital. Make that the psychiatric ward. With the nutjobs. Clearly, this is all a huge mistake. Forget about the bandages on his wrists and the notes on his chart. Forget about his problems with his best friend, Allie, and her boyfriend, Burke.

Jeff's perfectly fine, perfectly normal, not like the other kids in the hospital with him. Now they've got problems. But a funny thing happens as his forty-five-day sentence drags on—the crazies start to seem less crazy.




Bonus



I don't want to be crazy
by Samantha Schutz



A harrowing, remarkable poetry memoir about one girl's struggle with anxiety disorder. This is a true story of growing up, breaking down, and coming to grips with a psychological disorder. When Samantha Schutz first left home for college, she was excited by the possibilities -- freedom from parents, freedom from a boyfriend who was reckless with her affections, freedom from the person she was supposed to be.

At first, she revelled in the independence. . . but as pressures increased, she began to suffer anxiety attacks that would leave her mentally shaken and physically incapacitated. Thus began a hard road of discovery and coping, powerfully rendered in this poetry memoir.

6 comments

  1. Schizo sounds extremely interesting. I'll have to look into that. I have 13 Reasons Why on mine, also! :)

    https://geronimoreads.wordpress.com/2016/04/14/books-with-hard-topics-top-5-wednesday/

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    1. I'm going to check yours right now! And schizo was a quite nice book. Hope you like it.

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  2. Ooh literally all of these (except 13 Reasons Why) are on my TBR! I'm really excited to get to all of them especially Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock and By The Time You Read This I'll Be Dead. I love unreliable narrators too so Schizo should be good too. Fantastic list!

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    1. I'm super glad you have them on your tbr and I hope you get to read them soon enough, you'll like them for sure.

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  3. Amazing post! I love FMLP and it definitely deals with a very hard subject

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    1. Indeed it does, I absolutely loved that book!

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